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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Ted Poe
U.S. Representative, R-Texas
CSPAN 07/24/2013
Poe: warrants need to be particular and specific about the places to be searched and the items to be seized. No judge would ever sign a general search warrant like the British did, allowing police to search every house on the block much less seize everybody's phone records. But this is what has happened under section 15 under the government. Government's gone too far in the name of security that the fourth amendment has been bruised. Rein in government invasion, no more dragnet operations, get a specific warrant based on probable cause or stay out of our lives. And that's the way it is.
Jerrold Nadler
U.S. Representative, D-New York
CSPAN 07/24/2013
Nadler: This amendment stops the government from misusing section 215 to engage in the dragnet collection of all of our personal telephone records. Congress did not grant the executive the authority to collect everything it wants so long as it limits any subsequent search of that data. This amendment restores the requirement that records stored are relevant to an authorized foreign intelligence or terrorist investigation. It restores the minimal relevant standard required by Congress but ignored
Jerrold Nadler
U.S. Representative, D-New York
CSPAN 07/24/2013
Nadler continued: by successive administrations. No administration should be permitted to operate above or beyond the law as they have done this this respect. I therefore urge all of my colleagues to vote in favor of the Amash/Conyers amendment.
Morgan Griffith
U.S. Representative, D-Virginia
CSPAN 07/24/2013
Griffith: General warrants, writs of assistance, that's what we’re looking at and the founding founders found that to be an anathema. What they’re doing does violate the 4th amendment-- we took an oath to uphold the constitution and we’re supposed to rely on a secret agency that deals with a secret court that deals with a selective secrecy committee and members of Congress are limited to their access to the actions of that committee and we are supposed to trust them. Folks, we have a job to do. I yield back. I vote yes.
Tulsi Gabbard
U.S. Representative D-Hawaii
CSPAN 07/24/2013
Gabbard: Countless men and women from my state of Hawaii and all across the country have worn the uniform and put their lives on the line to protect our freedoms and our liberties. I cannot in good conscience vote to take a single dollar from the pockets of hard-working taxpayers from across the country to pay for programs which infringe on the very liberties and freedoms our troops have fought and died for. Ben Franklin said they who gave up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Justin Amash
U.S. Representative D-Michigan
CSPAN 07/24/2013
Amash: We are here to answer one question for the people we represent. Do we oppose the suspicionless collection of every American’s phone records. When you have the chance to stand up for American's privacy, did you? Please support the Amash amendment and oppose the NSA’s blanket surveillance of our constituents.
Rick Mulvaney
U.S. Representative R-South Carolina
CSPAN 07/24/2013
Mulvaney: Here’s the question of balancing privacy and security. it's a question of who will do the balancing. right now the balancing is being done by people we do not know, people we do not elect. in large part right now by somebody who has admitted lying to this body in a hearing. That's wrong. We should be doing the balancing. we were elected to do that. We need to pass this amendment so that we can do the balancing, not folks that are not elected who we do not know.
Thomas Massie
U.S. Representative R-Kentucky
LINKTV 07/24/2013
Massie: The Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper was here in March and unambiguously lied to congress. i believe he was under oath. And it sets a bad precedent for the whole organization to let him keep his post. i think he should be relieved of his post for lying to congress. He could have chosen other words to say. He could've said,
John Conyers
U.S. Representative, D-Michigan, Judiciary Ranking Member
LINKTV 07/24/2013
Goodman: Could he be brought up on charges of perjury? Massie: If this were any American citizen or civilian, they would certainly be prosecuted for what he just did. At a minimum, he should lose his post. Goodman: do you agree with that, Congress member Conyers? Conyers: yes, ma'am, I do, completely.
John Conyers
U.S. Representative, D-Michigan, Judiciary Ranking Member
LINKTV 07/24/2013
Goodman: (Clapper) himself admitted that he did not tell the truth. Conyers: I think we are now at the point of having a more honest disclosure of what is going on in our intelligence community, which we now find was very deliberately ignoring parts of the law that they knew perfectly well they were violating.
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